Retirement village – Ons Dorp http://onsdorp.net/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 20:54:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://onsdorp.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Retirement village – Ons Dorp http://onsdorp.net/ 32 32 Open recruitment event at Middleton Hall Retirement Village https://onsdorp.net/open-recruitment-event-at-middleton-hall-retirement-village/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/open-recruitment-event-at-middleton-hall-retirement-village/ Learn more about careers at Middleton Hall Retirement Village at an open recruitment event on Thursday, October 20 from 4-8 p.m. The event provides the perfect opportunity to visit Middleton Hall, meet department heads, discuss face-to-face opportunities and view the fabulous facilities at Middleton St George Retirement Village, near Darlington. Middleton Hall’s operational teams cover […]]]>

Learn more about careers at Middleton Hall Retirement Village at an open recruitment event on Thursday, October 20 from 4-8 p.m.

The event provides the perfect opportunity to visit Middleton Hall, meet department heads, discuss face-to-face opportunities and view the fabulous facilities at Middleton St George Retirement Village, near Darlington.

Middleton Hall’s operational teams cover a wide range of areas including care, support work, housekeeping, catering, reception, spa and activities, marketing, administration, transport, areas and maintenance.

The employee-owned business is currently expanding and there are rarely available opportunities to become the next passionate, caring, engaged and well-rewarded employee.

These include the recruitment of support workers for the village’s innovative Middleton Oaks service, which aims to support people living with the onset of dementia and which is currently being expanded.

Made up of households developed for people who want to lead as independent a life as possible but need a high level of practical support, Middleton Oaks is a popular and much sought-after location.

Echo of the North:

Kirsty Wilson-Hartley, deputy manager of Middleton Oaks, who worked in community care before joining the team, explained: “We mainly support people with memory problems, from early to late stage, no day look alike”.

“You have to have a passion to want to care for people, but it’s about taking care of people, making them smile, making them laugh.”

Nicola Angus, a senior support worker in Middleton Oaks, added: “The best thing about my job is taking care of people and the joy you get from seeing them happy when you throw parties and help them. to do things they love.

She added: “Middleton Hall is like a five-star luxury hotel for residents. It’s the best!”

Echo of the North:

Middleton Hall Retirement Village is unusual in its industry because it is owned by its employees. The people who work there are co-owners of the business, which provides greater opportunity to make a difference and participate in the future direction of the business.

The company is built on a caring, people-oriented culture and career progression is always offered to those who work there. It prides itself on offering values-based recruitment, emphasizing candidate qualities and not just qualifications.

The open recruiting event at Middleton Hall Retirement Village will take place on Thursday, October 20, from 4-8 p.m. No appointment is necessary – just show up!

Echo of the North:

To find out more about working at Middleton Hall, where carer pay rates start from £10 per hour and permanent contracts with variable hours are offered, visit: www.middletonhallretirementvillage.co.uk/ourteam/join-us

Middleton Hall Retirement Village, Middleton St. George, Darlington, County Durham, DL2 1HA www.middletonhallretirementvillage.co.uk

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Named: Retirement Village keeping widow’s $790,000 for 10 months after she leaves https://onsdorp.net/named-retirement-village-keeping-widows-790000-for-10-months-after-she-leaves/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 00:07:14 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/named-retirement-village-keeping-widows-790000-for-10-months-after-she-leaves/ People who move to retirement villages may struggle to get their money back. Photo / provided A Tauranga village is at the center of publicity for failing to repay a widow $790,000 ten months after she left. Two sources and the village director identified the location but Consumer did not name it when he published […]]]>

People who move to retirement villages may struggle to get their money back. Photo / provided

A Tauranga village is at the center of publicity for failing to repay a widow $790,000 ten months after she left.

Two sources and the village director identified the location but Consumer did not

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Northland Retirement Village’s new care home is hosted on the site of the former RSA building https://onsdorp.net/northland-retirement-villages-new-care-home-is-hosted-on-the-site-of-the-former-rsa-building/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/northland-retirement-villages-new-care-home-is-hosted-on-the-site-of-the-former-rsa-building/ Earthworks have begun within sight of Metlifecare’s 64-bed care home and 34 independent living villas as part of an expansion of its Oakridge Villas Retirement Village. Photo / Jenny Ling More retirement villas and a retirement home with a secure dementia unit have been welcomed for senior residents of the Far North. Metlifecare has been […]]]>

Earthworks have begun within sight of Metlifecare’s 64-bed care home and 34 independent living villas as part of an expansion of its Oakridge Villas Retirement Village. Photo / Jenny Ling

More retirement villas and a retirement home with a secure dementia unit have been welcomed for senior residents of the Far North.

Metlifecare has been given the green light to start building a 64-bed care center

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Residents of King’s Park Retirement Village clash with grass cutting https://onsdorp.net/residents-of-kings-park-retirement-village-clash-with-grass-cutting/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/residents-of-kings-park-retirement-village-clash-with-grass-cutting/ Bosses at a retirement village have hit back at claims they were seeking to take advantage of their elderly residents in a dispute over grass-cutting arrangements. Residents of King’s Park Village in Canvey have been informed that Cove Communities, the company that runs the retirement village, will no longer be cutting the grass in residents’ […]]]>

Bosses at a retirement village have hit back at claims they were seeking to take advantage of their elderly residents in a dispute over grass-cutting arrangements.

Residents of King’s Park Village in Canvey have been informed that Cove Communities, the company that runs the retirement village, will no longer be cutting the grass in residents’ gardens from October 31.

Bosses say half the residents already maintain the grass on their plot themselves, with management paying contractors to cut the communal grass.

READ MORE

They claim these contractors wrongly cut some residents’ grass “without payment”, adding that “it cost a significant sum at a time of enormous inflationary pressure on the park”.

Village bosses claim they should have cut every patch of grass ‘which would have increased the overall fee’ or told residents they were responsible for their own grass ‘as per the agreement they have voluntarily concluded”.

One resident, who did not wish to be named, says he does not have the physical capacity to cut his own plot and fears he will be saddled with the bill amid the cost of living crisis.

He said: “We are struggling to pay our bills as they are and now we have this kick in the teeth.

“A lot of people here are on benefits and with soaring prices for food, electricity and gas.

“Because of this extra expense, some of us may have to go without heating or food so that the business can make more profit.”

A spokesperson for King’s Park Village said: “We totally refute any suggestion that the park is seeking to take advantage of new grass cutting arrangements. The plot agreements between each resident and the park make it clear that the Residents are responsible for maintenance such as mowing the grass on their own plots.

“From spring next year, residents can choose to maintain their own pitch themselves, hire the existing contractor at a cost of £3.75 a week or hire their own independent contractor to maintain their pitch. . If a resident needs to discuss this matter with us, we will be happy to do so in the weeks and months ahead.

“We believe we continue to demonstrate how much we value the welfare and well-being of park owners.”

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Private New Zealand retirement village chain Real Living could be sold for $400m: speculation rising https://onsdorp.net/private-new-zealand-retirement-village-chain-real-living-could-be-sold-for-400m-speculation-rising/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 01:11:17 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/private-new-zealand-retirement-village-chain-real-living-could-be-sold-for-400m-speculation-rising/ Warkworth Oaks Retirement Village, owned by Real Living. Photo / Provided Private New Zealand retirement village chain Real Living could be sold for more than $400 million, according to industry speculation. But nothing is confirmed. Retirement village industry insiders say Real Living is controlled by a family may be interested in selling, but family is […]]]>

Warkworth Oaks Retirement Village, owned by Real Living. Photo / Provided

Private New Zealand retirement village chain Real Living could be sold for more than $400 million, according to industry speculation.

But nothing is confirmed.

Retirement village industry insiders say Real Living is controlled by a

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An abandoned summer camp could become a retirement village https://onsdorp.net/an-abandoned-summer-camp-could-become-a-retirement-village/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/an-abandoned-summer-camp-could-become-a-retirement-village/ A once bustling Christian holiday camp, abandoned for 15 years, is being transformed into a sprawling retirement village. Developer Xiros Limited has unveiled plans to turn Herne Bay Court into a 60-bed care home, with a further 72 flats and 49 bungalows. The main building at the Herne Bay Court site, called Parsonage House, will […]]]>

A once bustling Christian holiday camp, abandoned for 15 years, is being transformed into a sprawling retirement village.

Developer Xiros Limited has unveiled plans to turn Herne Bay Court into a 60-bed care home, with a further 72 flats and 49 bungalows.

The main building at the Herne Bay Court site, called Parsonage House, will be converted into a retirement home
Outside the former Herne Bay Christian Center
Outside the former Herne Bay Christian Center

A shop, restaurant and hairdressers – all of which will be run by the new facility – will also be erected on the nine-acre site on Canterbury Road, one of the main roads into Herne Bay.

Residents believe the proposals will “only be good for the area”, as the monument has attracted vandals and unruly teenagers since it was vacated in 2007.

Neighbor Ray Radmore, whose Parsonage Road cattery faces the plot, told KentOnline: ‘I hope it happens because we’ve had so much vandalism there.

“The kids broke in just for fun – it’s getting ridiculous and one of them is going to get hurt.

“It happens once or twice a week, even now. At the height of it, people were also taking the lead.

Herne Bay Court developers have also released visuals of its bungalows
Herne Bay Court developers have also released visuals of its bungalows
Parsonage Road cattery owner Ray Radmore backs Herne Bay Court proposals
Parsonage Road cattery owner Ray Radmore backs Herne Bay Court proposals

“Provided we have the right number of doctors in place then it will only be good for the region as it is a lovely green site in a perfect position.

“It’s going to be like a mini village, and it’ll be good for the community. Go for it.”

Originally known as Parsonage House, the site was built in 1896.

Shortly after, it housed an engineering school, before being occupied by a succession of military units during the Second World War.

Shortly after changing hands in 1948, the grounds were transformed into a Christian convention and vacation center, where visitors have enjoyed its facilities for nearly 60 years.

Photo of the north elevation of Herne Bay Court (59220385)
Photo of the north elevation of Herne Bay Court (59220385)
Visual of the additional care block on the Herne Bay Court site
Visual of the additional care block on the Herne Bay Court site

At the time, its main building overlooked lawns, a swimming pool and tennis courts.

Falling demand and the prospect of housing developments near the site influenced the decision of the owners of the Shropshire-based Center Ministries Office to sell.

Senior Councilor Andrew Cook added: ‘The building is a waste of space at the moment.

“The movement on this site is a good thing, and the concept [of a retirement village] looks positive.

Cllr Cook says Kent County Council had recently considered whether Herne Bay Court would be a suitable site to house a new secondary school, but it was deemed too small for such a project.

The Herne Bay Christian Center had tennis courts and a swimming pool
The Herne Bay Christian Center had tennis courts and a swimming pool
Andrew Cook, Herne Bay Senior Advisor
Andrew Cook, Herne Bay Senior Advisor

Documents show that Xiros wants to demolish part of the main building and build an extension to create a retirement home equipped with 60 en-suite bedrooms.

The new bungalows and apartments will be service residences and independent residences for the elderly.

Xiros expects the retirement village to employ up to 17 full-time people.

Plans filed this week with Canterbury City Council state: “Xiros has been working for 24 months to deliver a well designed and deliverable programme.

“The backers are now in place to deliver the site.

Queen Victoria Jubilee commemorative plaque on the rear outbuilding (59220378)
Queen Victoria Jubilee commemorative plaque on the rear outbuilding (59220378)
Herne Bay Christian Center has been closed after almost 60 years.  Photo: Barry Goodwin
Herne Bay Christian Center has been closed after almost 60 years. Photo: Barry Goodwin

“The funder’s approach to care is to design and build unique, market-leading facilities for the elderly population and for those who wish to live independently but also require a level of daily care.”

This is not the first time that a retirement village has been proposed for the Eddington land.

In 2012 developers revealed plans for a £30 million scheme, which included 150 apartments, a health and wellness center and a clubhouse.

Consultation on the proposals took place that year and it was hoped construction could begin in 2014 – with the village creating 150 jobs.

But initial plans were pushed back by council officials in November 2012 as concerns were raised about its size, layout and scale.

Herne Bay Court once had manicured lawns but is now overgrown and an eyesore
Herne Bay Court once had manicured lawns but is now overgrown and an eyesore

A revised offer of 117 units was submitted the following year, before being approved in December 2013.

Work was due to start in January 2015, but was later postponed to the following year.

“The existing building permit was never built due to the former developer’s difficulties in obtaining financing, before the land was acquired by Xiros,” the planning documents add.

“Vandalism is a problem here – despite the security measures taken – and it is in the interest of the site that it is developed with active use rather than lying dormant.

“The proposal brings an abandoned site back to the community and reconsiders the retirement village model as one that can be successfully delivered.”

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Launch of plans for 203 additional homes in the retirement village https://onsdorp.net/launch-of-plans-for-203-additional-homes-in-the-retirement-village/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 08:34:24 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/launch-of-plans-for-203-additional-homes-in-the-retirement-village/ A NEW retirement community in Essex could be expanded to build a further 203 homes as plans for the final phase have been launched. An application for the “completion phase” of the Burnham Waters development in Maldon was approved by the local council on August 31. Burnham Waters Limited wants to build 143 bungalows and […]]]>

A NEW retirement community in Essex could be expanded to build a further 203 homes as plans for the final phase have been launched.

An application for the “completion phase” of the Burnham Waters development in Maldon was approved by the local council on August 31.

Burnham Waters Limited wants to build 143 bungalows and 60 apartments with between one and three bedrooms on land north of Maldon Road and west of Burnham on Crouch.

According to a design and access statement, this would be in addition to 103 bungalows, a 70-bedroom care home and a 55-bedroom independent living building approved in the first phase of the scheme, and 232 houses and a community building in multiple uses approved in phase two.

It says: “The bungalows will be large and spacious with plenty of daylight through large windows, particularly on the rear elevations, allowing residents to benefit from the outdoor terraces and, in some cases, the expansive views across. green fingers and across the site overlooking the currently unbroken rural landscape.

The statement goes on to say that the apartments will be built beyond national standards for space.

It says: “Private amenity space will be provided for each house in the form of a balcony, either recessed or projecting.

“These will be sized according to the occupancy of each apartment, allowing sufficient space for outdoor dining and drying clothes, as well as other activities. In addition to the balconies, around the apartment buildings are a number of open spaces providing privacy that will be available to residents.

The first phase of the program was approved by the board in October 2020. Work on this phase has already begun.

Phase two was approved on appeal in 2022, but work will not begin until phase one is “significantly delivered,” including the completion of a medical center, community center and stores.

This latter application is for outline permission, with reserved matters such as appearance, landscaping and scale to be presented in a separate application in the future.

According to the release, the final phase is intended to follow the same design principles as the first two.

However, there are also plans to create a “more relaxed edge” between the development and the green belt.

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Catholic nonprofit files plans for retirement village https://onsdorp.net/catholic-nonprofit-files-plans-for-retirement-village/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 11:39:32 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/catholic-nonprofit-files-plans-for-retirement-village/ A Catholic organization, which began life more than 100 years ago providing accommodation for the blind, has applied to build a $35 million retirement community in the northeast suburbs of Melbourne. VMCH has submitted a planning application to Banyule City Council for 56 apartments in a five-storey retirement village in Ivanhoe East, approximately 8 km […]]]>

A Catholic organization, which began life more than 100 years ago providing accommodation for the blind, has applied to build a $35 million retirement community in the northeast suburbs of Melbourne.

VMCH has submitted a planning application to Banyule City Council for 56 apartments in a five-storey retirement village in Ivanhoe East, approximately 8 km from the CBD.

The plan is for a mix of one, two and three bedroom self-contained living units, with a roof terrace, cinema, wine cellar, gymnasium, lounge, cafe, restaurant and chapel .

The facility sits on two adjacent properties on Lower Heidelberg Road and, at 5732 m², is the largest property in the immediate area.

Melbourne-based planning consultants Human Habitats filed the application on behalf of VMCH, saying the Ivanhoe East site had a history of senior living and specialist accommodation.

“Currently on the site is a decommissioned residential aged care facility and 23 independent living units,” Human Habitats wrote.

“The buildings have reached their useful life and are no longer fit for purpose.”

Human Habitats said VMCH is in the process of relocating many residents to other purpose-built facilities, including a nearby mission-based affordable housing project under construction.

The intention was to build and hold a long-term residential asset.

▲ The planning application calls for 56 apartments in a five-story retirement village in Ivanhoe East.

Jackson Clements Burrows Architects will design the building, beating two other architects in an invitation-only design competition.

Of the 56 planned apartments, six will be one-bedroom, 37 will be two-bedroom and the remaining 13 will be three-bedroom.

A basement will allow parking for 81 cars and there will be approximately 1370 m² of outdoor common space.

At five stories, the retirement village will rise to a maximum height of 20.4m with the bulk of the building at 18 metres.

However, during pre-filing discussions, Banyule Council made it clear that the height of the buildings could be an issue.

In an email written in June, Hayley Plank of Banyule’s development planning department said, “a four-story building is considered more appropriate.”

“The maximum height of 18m, plus a 2.4m high partially covered roof terrace, is significantly higher than any other development in the immediate area,” Plank said.

‘The adjacent development includes a line of single storey accommodation to the west which are all separately owned and are unlikely to be redeveloped in the near future,’ she said.

“The five-story building will dominate these dwellings and views to the west.”

VMCH started as the Catholic Braille Writers’ Association in 1907, and about 30 years later opened the Villa Maria Hostel – a residence for the blind – in Donald Street, Prahran.

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NSW retirement village operators must provide data to government https://onsdorp.net/nsw-retirement-village-operators-must-provide-data-to-government/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 00:00:03 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/nsw-retirement-village-operators-must-provide-data-to-government/ NSW retirement village operators have been told it is now necessary to provide the state government with data to overcome a ‘lack of transparency’. Operators have until September 30 to provide the data after the NSW government passed the Amendment to the Retirement Villages (Operator Obligations) Regulations 2022. “These regulations are part of the New […]]]>

NSW retirement village operators have been told it is now necessary to provide the state government with data to overcome a ‘lack of transparency’.

Operators have until September 30 to provide the data after the NSW government passed the Amendment to the Retirement Villages (Operator Obligations) Regulations 2022.

“These regulations are part of the New South Wales Government’s response to the 2017 Greiner Inquiry into the New South Wales retirement village sector and addresses concerns about the lack of transparency of critical data on the retirement villages necessary for the regulator and consumers to make decisions”, said NSW Fair Trading.

Operators are required to provide data on the following categories to the Secretary of the Customer Service Department:

  • Name, address and contact details of retirement village and operator
  • Residents’ committee information (if applicable)
  • Number of units
  • Type of residence
  • Information on complaints handled internally by the operator
  • Village contracts or pricing
  • Resident and staff demographic information
  • Other management and operational details

The operators are also required to submit annual data within one month of the end of the village’s fiscal year. If any of the information changes, they are required to provide updated data within 21 days of becoming aware of the change.

The NSW Government will release some of the data it deems relevant to consumers in a publicly accessible digital portal next year.

“As CEO of Warrigal with 10 villages across NSW and several more in development planning, we welcome the amendments to the NSW RVA being implemented this week,” said Mark Sewell (pictured), Director of the Foundation on the ACCPA Board of Directors.

“The type of reforms underway now are, in our view, minimum public reporting requirements for good operators. We see ourselves as more than home builders. We create places where communities of seniors can thrive. It needs psychological security and trust to be reciprocated. Older people often invest large sums, even their life savings, in an older people’s village assuming they have a trusted operator who can ensure they are safe now, engaged regularly and have support. if they need it in the future. If all operators do this, we build trust in our industry and we all win.

“This is an annual requirement so should not be onerous for operators unless the government provides a simple and user-friendly portal. It’s the least they should do. Added Mark, who in August announced he would retire in October 2022.

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‘Misleading and inaccurate portrayal of village life’: Retirement village owners retaliate in battle to reform sector https://onsdorp.net/misleading-and-inaccurate-portrayal-of-village-life-retirement-village-owners-retaliate-in-battle-to-reform-sector/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/misleading-and-inaccurate-portrayal-of-village-life-retirement-village-owners-retaliate-in-battle-to-reform-sector/ Retirement village owners have proposed a set of “voluntary reforms” that they hope will ward off the threat of government regulation. It includes a crackdown on unfair terms in retirement village contracts and village operators who take too long to return capital to residents who leave a village. On August 10, village residents’ representative Nigel […]]]>

Retirement village owners have proposed a set of “voluntary reforms” that they hope will ward off the threat of government regulation.

It includes a crackdown on unfair terms in retirement village contracts and village operators who take too long to return capital to residents who leave a village.

On August 10, village residents’ representative Nigel Matthews invited MPs from the House of Commons Social and Community Services Committee to play a game of “villageopole” to highlight the need for fairer treatment for elderly residents. from the village.

But Graham Wilkinson, chairman of the Retirement Villages Association (RVA), hit back at a committee hearing on Wednesday by telling MPs the game of villageopoly had given them a ‘misleading and inaccurate portrayal of village life’.

READ MORE:
* Consumer NZ to complain to Commerce Commission about potentially misleading advertising by retirement villages
* More Kiwis opting for life in a retirement village is driving demand for the construction industry
* Retirement village owners promise to address long waits for repayment and review housing rights agreements

“Independent research conducted by the UMR shows overwhelming satisfaction rates. There is no other industry like ours with such satisfaction,” said Wilkinson.

Villageopoly was designed to draw MPs’ attention to unfair terms in retirement village contracts, and Matthews said: “We’re 100% in the game.”

Retirement villages provide managed housing for retirees and 50,000 older people now live in the 407 RVA member-owned villages.

Villageopoly – a game invented by the Association of Retirement Village Residents to explain to MPs how unfair certain retirement village contracts are.

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Villageopoly – a game invented by the Association of Retirement Village Residents to explain to MPs how unfair some retirement village contracts are.

People who enter retirement villages pay to buy an Occupancy Rights Agreement (ORA), getting most of their capital back when they leave.

But residents say some ORAs are unfair and some departing residents have to wait far too long to get their principal back.

This could make it difficult for them to transition into elderly care at a very vulnerable time in their lives, they say.

The Retirement Village Residents Association, led by Matthews, has asked Parliament for an update to the two-decade-old laws covering retirement villages.

The petition included a call for the return of ORA’s capital within 28 days, which the village operators said would impose unreasonable financial stress on them.

The petition sparked industry action.

Wilkinson told MPs that RVA members had now agreed to a “voluntary” package of reforms for its members, who made up 95 per cent of the retirement village sector.

Among the main changes is the obligation for village farmers who are members of the RVA to pay interest on unpaid capital, if a former resident has not been reimbursed within nine months of leaving a unit.

Its members would be asked to stop charging weekly fees once a unit was terminated and released.

“We have always accepted the need for improvements,” says Graham Wilkinson, president of the Retirement Villages Association.

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“We have always accepted the need for improvements,” says Graham Wilkinson, president of the Retirement Villages Association.

It would also ask members to remove unfair contract terms.

Matthews explained to MPs the difficulties that delays in reimbursing capital to departing residents could cause, particularly when they had to move to care facilities.

The RVA’s voluntary reforms included a commitment by its members to take all reasonable steps to assist departing residents who needed their capital to enter residence in order to obtain a loan from the Department of Social Development.

If it was not possible to obtain a loan, the village operators would lend the departing resident enough money to cover his care costs, until his capital was returned to him.

The RVA’s voluntary reforms would only cover its members and would be voted on by members next year.

“We have always accepted the need to make improvements to the industry’s consumer protection regime where they are feasible and make sense,” said Wilkinson.

“Developing and applying industry best practices is a more efficient and fairer way to address these issues rather than legislative upheaval for the sake of it,” he said.

Matthews called the RVA’s voluntary reforms a token gesture that has failed to address the sector’s pressing problems.

The government is committed to reviewing the legislation.

Retired Commissioner Jane Wrightson supports the review of the legislation.

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