Retirement establishment – Ons Dorp http://onsdorp.net/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 20:55:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://onsdorp.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Retirement establishment – Ons Dorp http://onsdorp.net/ 32 32 Tax efficiency in retirement | New https://onsdorp.net/tax-efficiency-in-retirement-new/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 20:31:00 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/tax-efficiency-in-retirement-new/ Owill you pay more taxes in retirement? It’s possible. But that will largely depend on how you generate income. Will it be work? Will it come from pension plans? And if it comes from retirement plans, it’s important to understand what types of plans will fund your retirement. Another factor to consider is the role […]]]>

Owill you pay more taxes in retirement? It’s possible. But that will largely depend on how you generate income. Will it be work? Will it come from pension plans? And if it comes from retirement plans, it’s important to understand what types of plans will fund your retirement.

Another factor to consider is the role Social Security will play in your retirement. When do you expect to start receiving Social Security benefits? If you have a spouse, when does he expect to receive benefits? Answering key questions about Social Security benefits is essential to better understand how it will affect your taxable income.

What is a pre-tax investment? Traditional IRAs and 401(k)s are examples of pre-tax investments designed to help you save for retirement.

You will not pay any tax on the contributions you make to these accounts until you start receiving distributions. Pre-tax investments are also called tax-deferred investments because the money you accumulate in these accounts can benefit from tax-deferred growth.

For those covered by a workplace retirement plan, the tax deduction for a traditional IRA in 2021 is being phased out for incomes between $105,000 and $125,000 for married couples filing jointly, and between $66,000 and 76. $000 for single filers.

Keep in mind that once you reach age 72, you must begin receiving the required minimum distributions from a traditional IRA, 401(k), and other defined contribution plans in most countries. case. Withdrawals are taxed as ordinary income and, if made before age 59.5, may be subject to a 10% federal penalty tax.

What is an after-tax investment? A Roth IRA is the best known. When you put money into a Roth IRA, the contribution is made with after-tax dollars. Like a traditional IRA, contributions to a Roth IRA are limited based on income. For 2021, contributions to a Roth IRA are being phased out between $198,000 and $208,000 for married couples filing jointly and between $125,000 and $140,000 for single filers.2

To qualify for tax-free, penalty-free income withdrawal, distributions from the Roth IRA must meet a five-year holding requirement and occur after age 59½. A tax-free and penalty-free withdrawal can also be made under certain other circumstances, such as the death of the owner. The original owner of the Roth IRA is not required to make minimum annual withdrawals.

Remember, this article is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for real-life advice, so be sure to consult with your tax, legal, or financial professionals before making any changes to your retirement strategy.

Are you looking for greater tax efficiency? In retirement, this is especially important – and worth discussing. A few financial adjustments can help you manage your tax obligations.

This article was provided by Philip J Ambrose, CFP®

CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™

Rosenberg Alvis & Ambrose Wealth Management

(229) 702 6100

312 N. Broad Street

Thomasville, Georgia 31792

-And-

1876 ​​Eider Ct.

Tallahassee, FL 32308

www.raawealthmgmt.com

Securities and investment advisory services offered by Calton & Associates, Inc. member FINRA and SIPC, a registered investment adviser.

Rosenberg Alvis Ambrose Wealth Management is not owned or controlled by Calton & Associates, Inc.

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Penn State Law Student Endorses Sanchez-Crynes Visionary Legacy Scholarship https://onsdorp.net/penn-state-law-student-endorses-sanchez-crynes-visionary-legacy-scholarship/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 12:15:14 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/penn-state-law-student-endorses-sanchez-crynes-visionary-legacy-scholarship/ UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania – Current Penn State law student Victoria Crynes and her family have established the Sanchez-Crynes Visionary Legacy Doted Scholarship at Penn State Law. The endowment will benefit first-generation law students in their second or third year of law school who have an interest in corporate law, who are members of the Latinx […]]]>

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania – Current Penn State law student Victoria Crynes and her family have established the Sanchez-Crynes Visionary Legacy Doted Scholarship at Penn State Law. The endowment will benefit first-generation law students in their second or third year of law school who have an interest in corporate law, who are members of the Latinx Law Student Association, and who are committed to serving the Hispanic community.

Crynes, a third-year first-generation Hispanic law student at Penn State Law, said, “The scholarship is for first-generation students who often face tremendous challenges getting to law school, paying their studies and even understand the path to becoming a lawyer”.

The average law student has $165,000 in student debt. The mission of the Sanchez-Crynes Visionary Legacy Endowed Scholarship is to achieve equity and representation for Hispanic and underrepresented communities in the legal profession by helping to make a law degree more financially accessible.

Hispanics, the fastest growing population in the United States, make up just 5% of the country’s 1.3 million lawyers – although the Hispanic American population is 62.1 million according to the data. of the 2021 U.S. Census.

Crynes wants this endowment to take a step forward to close that gap. “Ideally, the legal profession should reflect the diversity of American citizens – the communities it is meant to serve. Increasing the number of Hispanic lawyers is crucial to establishing a profession that reflects our diverse society, while creating a pipeline for more diverse judges,” she said.

The Sanchez-Crynes Visionary Legacy Endowed Scholarship Fund is named in honor of Crynes’ two grandfathers, Manuel T. Sanchez and Dr. Billy Crynes, who both dedicated their lives to student empowerment from communities that have historically been underrepresented in higher education.

Sanchez, Crynes’ maternal grandfather, volunteered for more than 40 years to help countless high school students at Frederick A. Douglass High School in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma’s first historically African-American high school. He served student-athletes by helping them obtain athletic scholarships, volunteering as an assistant baseball coach, securing funds for equipment and uniforms, and establishing the Premier League of baseball in Oklahoma for undocumented Hispanic immigrants.

“He dedicated his life to those in need, continually inspiring others to give back to the community. He is a legend in the community known as Papa Sanchez to some and Coach Sanchez to others,” Crynes said.

Crynes credits his grandfather Sanchez for teaching him that you can always find a way to make a difference. “I was raised to see how I could help others. When you see a need, you meet the need. You’re never too young to give back to the community.

His paternal grandfather, Dr. Crynes, was a first-generation student and former dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Oklahoma. As Dean, he invested in the Multicultural Engineering program and advocated for expanding the staff and further developing the program in the early 2000s. The program grew into a premier engineering program that included more of 500 students from historically underrepresented communities and ranks among the top three U.S. engineering programs for diversity, with many graduates becoming successful leaders in their respective fields.

“The legacy of my grandfathers shows that providing students with comprehensive resources, mentorship and support systems creates leaders. Continuing their legacy, I aspire to empower first generation law students. is critical to the future success of our nation,” Crynes said.

Crynes is an example of the positive impact of diversity scholarships and pipeline programs. After her sophomore year of high school, her dream of becoming a lawyer emerged while attending the Hispanic National Bar Foundation’s Future Latin American Leaders Summer Law Institute. Almost a decade later, Crynes received a full scholarship to Penn State Law. With this funding, Crynes was able to devote her time to study and engagement on campus, which led her to connect with Penn State Law alumni.

Two of these relationships led to her applying and being selected as a Skadden Fellow, Arps 1L in the Wilmington, Delaware office. Skadden, a multinational law firm, offers the 1L Scholars program to diverse first-year law students to increase inclusiveness in law while providing scholars with top-notch career development opportunities. Last fall, Crynes was awarded the new Skadden 1L Scholars Scholarship. Crynes chose to donate his scholarship money to create the Sanchez-Crynes Visionary Legacy Endowed Scholarship.

“I realized the ability to impact Hispanic students for generations to come, just by committing my scholarship money to an endowment,” Crynes said. “The Penn State Law Full Scholarship and Skadden’s decision to invest in their 1L Summer Scholars has given me the financial empowerment to partner with Penn State Law to increase diversity in the legal profession.”

Retired Vice Admiral James W. Houck, acting dean of Penn State Law and the School of International Affairs, said, “It is inspiring to see current students like Victoria blaze new trails to improve educational opportunities for future Penn State Law students. We are proud to take another step in Penn State’s commitment to fostering a diverse and welcoming environment.

Crynes explained, “I hope fellows will be able to focus on their studies, serve as leaders in the law school community, and engage with the wider legal community due to the reduced financial burden of law school. . Most importantly, I want them to understand that the selection committee, the scholarship donors, and I believe that they are the catalyst for creating positive change for first-generation law students and for Hispanics within of the legal community and beyond.

Crynes believes that people can make a difference and together contribute to greater impact. “During Hispanic Heritage Month, I encourage you to invest in this endowment — knowing that you are making a difference,” she said. “Anyone can contribute to the community, whether it’s through financial donations, mentoring, volunteering to conduct mock interviews or reaching out to student organizations. There is no need to wait for the future when positive changes can start now. To those who give money or time in the lives of students, thank you.

With the record-breaking success of “A Greater Penn State for 21st Century Excellence,” which raised $2.2 billion from 2016-2022, philanthropy helps maintain the University’s tradition of education, research, and service to communities across the Commonwealth and around the world. . Scholarships enable our institution to open doors and welcome students from all walks of life, support for transformative experiences enables our students and faculty to realize their vast leadership potential, and donations toward discovery and excellence help us serve and influence the world we share. To learn more about the impact of donations and the continued need for support, please visit increase.psu.edu.

If you would like to support this fund with a donation, please use this direct donation link.

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A Peruvian couple resisted changes in the business climate https://onsdorp.net/a-peruvian-couple-resisted-changes-in-the-business-climate/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 04:07:03 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/a-peruvian-couple-resisted-changes-in-the-business-climate/ In this file photo, owner Rosaura Pedroza, left, manager Eduardo Tineo, center, and bartender Paula Vargas, right, organize take-out orders in the kitchen of CJ Peruvian Bar and Restaurant on Wednesday, January 9 2019. (Dana Jensen/The Day) Buy photo prints New London ― Since arriving in the city in 1990, they have weathered the Great […]]]>
In this file photo, owner Rosaura Pedroza, left, manager Eduardo Tineo, center, and bartender Paula Vargas, right, organize take-out orders in the kitchen of CJ Peruvian Bar and Restaurant on Wednesday, January 9 2019. (Dana Jensen/The Day) Buy photo prints

New London ― Since arriving in the city in 1990, they have weathered the Great Recession and the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

And, despite some reservations about New London’s current direction, entrepreneurs Bladimir and Rosaura Pedroza and their CJ Peruvian Bar & Restaurant on the corner of Broad Street and Connecticut Avenue aren’t going anywhere.

” I can not move. I own the building,” Bladimir said in a recent interview at the restaurant, where he was preparing for another day.

Alternatively, he could consider moving the restaurant to the middle of New London’s booming downtown scene, which he says puts businesses on the outskirts of town at a disadvantage. He is also worried about soaring real estate prices and what he sees as an increase in violent crime.

Things are different because of the pandemic, he said, although he is optimistic they will go back to how they were.

” We are well ; not great, but OK,” he said. “Before the pandemic, it was great.”

State-imposed COVID-19 restrictions disrupted restaurant business for approximately 15 months, beginning in March 2020. Prior to that, the Pedrozas kept CJs open until 10 p.m. every night to accommodate the traffic at the bar which they added to the restaurant during an expansion in 2018.. Their workforce grew to more than a dozen employees, including bartenders.

“Now nobody comes to drink after 8 or 9, that’s why the first few hours,” Bladimir said.

CJ’s, which serves lunch and dinner, is open from 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and has six employees, none of whom are bartenders.

Peruvian natives, the Pedrozas―Bladimir is 58, Rosaura 60―met in New York in 1986 and married the following year at Manhattan City Hall. They first spoke to each other when Bladimir picked up a phone call intended for someone else. Rosaura was on the other end of the line.

“We talked for two hours,” recalls Bladimir. “I couldn’t meet her for two or three months.”

Inseparable ever since, the Pedrozas relocated to New London, where Bladimir had friends. He soon started working at the Benchmark Belt Co. factory in Madison, which no longer exists, and they both got part-time jobs at Foxwoods Resort Casino before going into real estate. They bought their first multi-family residence in the city in 1991 and eventually rented 23 apartments.

Luckily, Bladimir said, they sold all of their rental properties shortly before the US economy crashed in 2007. Now they only own the building that houses their restaurant and the house they bought from Waterford in 2003.

Running a restaurant had always been Bladimir’s dream, though neither he nor Rosaura knew much of what it would entail.

“My mother had operated a small restaurant in Peru,” he said. “I’ve always wanted to bring the Peruvian to the region. When we got here, you had to go to Hartford for Peruvian food.

When the building at 255 Broad St. became available, the Pedrozas purchased it and began a major renovation, replacing walls, plumbing, electrical wiring. Rosaura and Bladimir’s mother, who both knew how to cook, trained at a family establishment in Providence to learn how to cook for a restaurant.

The 2018 expansion quadrupled the size of their restaurant, which now seats 105 people. Before the expansion, its name was Pollos a la Brasa, which in Spanish means “grilled chickens”.

Known for dishes such as its long-marinated roast chicken and chicha morada, a “purple corn refreshment,” CJ’s caters to a mix of 40% American and 30% Peruvian customers, with the rest being “a variety of cultures “, according to Bladimir.

“We’re bringing some color to the city,” he said.

While Bladimir wants the Pedrozas’ adult children, Christopher and Jessica, to be interested in eventually taking over CJ, they have moved to Colorado and Tampa, Florida, respectively, to pursue other pursuits.

First in and last out of the restaurant each day, Bladimir sees no retirement in his immediate future, however intriguing the idea.

“I can’t stand still, though,” he said.

b.hallenbeck@theday.com

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Mexican government says it will take months to recover bodies of Coahuila coal miners https://onsdorp.net/mexican-government-says-it-will-take-months-to-recover-bodies-of-coahuila-coal-miners/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 20:24:47 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/mexican-government-says-it-will-take-months-to-recover-bodies-of-coahuila-coal-miners/ The collapse of the Pinabete coal mine in Coahuila, Mexico on August 3 left 10 miners trapped and their escape route flooded. They are now presumed dead. Four minors were able to escape and are now hospitalized. On August 15, the 13th day of rescue, following a second flood in the galleries of the mine, […]]]>

The collapse of the Pinabete coal mine in Coahuila, Mexico on August 3 left 10 miners trapped and their escape route flooded. They are now presumed dead. Four minors were able to escape and are now hospitalized. On August 15, the 13th day of rescue, following a second flood in the galleries of the mine, the nature of the search changed. It is now a question of recovering the corpses of the 10 men. *

Rescue officials estimate it will take at least six to 11 months to recover the bodies. “We were fine until an opening widened from the nearby abandoned mine, which stores more water,” Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said.

Rescue operation at the Pinabete mine in Coahuila, Mexico, August 18. (Protección Civil México, @CNPC_MX)

The “adjoining mine”, Las Conchas, which closed in 1996, is very close to the Salinas River, the source of the flood waters. The company (El Pinabete Mining Company) had obtained an operating license from the Ministry of Economy and was supposed to be inspected by the Ministry of Labor (in charge of all mine inspections).

Permits are issued even though another branch of government, the Mexican Geological Service (Servicio Geológico Mexicano—SGM) determined some time ago that the entire area was unsafe for mining.

In 2013, the Mexico news magazine, Process obtained from SGM maps of the coal region in which many areas of the region are hatched with red lines indicating where not to mine.

The Pinabete mine was operated under contract with the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) to supply fuel to public power plants located in Coahuila in accordance with the current energy policy. Since taking office in 2019, Lopez Obrador, known as AMLO, has pursued a more nationalist energy policy, favoring the use of fossil fuels extracted in Mexico.

Pinabete consisted of three interconnected narrow vertical shafts leading to galleries 60 to 80 meters deep, flooded. By any standard, the mine was dangerous; its miners had no safety equipment, there was no emergency or hazard-mitigation equipment, and no way to signal the surface. The miners worked bent over in the gallery of the mine.

When the pit flooded, the 10 victims simply did not have time to escape. However, local parents and miners suggested that they might have survived initially by finding higher ground and therefore strongly condemned the authorities’ slow and ineffective response.

According to a report by The Day correspondent Leopoldo Ramos, the lack of safety conditions brought back the tragedy of February 19, 2006, when a methane explosion killed 65 miners, 63 of whom are still underground. The mining giant IMMSA (Industria Minera México Sociedad Anónima) is directly responsible for these deaths.) a division of Grupo Mexico, a powerful, wealthy and well-connected conglomerate with tentacles in oil, copper, transportation and coal mining.

As with the long list of mining disasters and deaths in this region, no company, government agency, or union has ever been held responsible (less than a month after the Pasta de Conchos explosion in Mexico City, the federal chamber of deputies approved constitutional reforms that rewarded the coal barons, including IMMSA, with new operating permits guaranteeing more than $500 million in profits).

According to official sources, in consultation with relatives, the plan is now to dig a hole next to the mine to recover the 10 bodies. Following this, a monument will be placed in honor of the fallen men.

In 2012, under the administration of Enrique Peña Nieto, a “Pact for Mexico” was signed by the main political parties (PAN, PRI, PRD, Greens), which, among other things, abolished underground coal mining, in the absence of guarantees for the safety of minors. A decade passed without any change. State and federal regulators continue to treat the coal barons with kid gloves at the cost of human lives.

Over the past 25 years, at least 153 coal miners have died in preventable mining accidents (80 since 2006). A government mine safety and inspection system exists in name only and lacks funding.

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New Jersey Supreme Court Clarifies Classification of Independent Contractors – Employee Benefits and Compensation https://onsdorp.net/new-jersey-supreme-court-clarifies-classification-of-independent-contractors-employee-benefits-and-compensation/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 12:40:38 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/new-jersey-supreme-court-clarifies-classification-of-independent-contractors-employee-benefits-and-compensation/ Newark, New Jersey (September 14, 2022) – The recent decision of the Supreme Court of New Jersey in East Bay Drywall, LLC v. Department of Labor and Workforce Development, File No. A-7-21 (August 2, 2022), provides guidance on the dangers that can arise when companies incorrectly classify workers as independent contractors rather than employees. Under […]]]>

Newark, New Jersey (September 14, 2022) – The recent decision of the Supreme Court of New Jersey in East Bay Drywall, LLC v. Department of Labor and Workforce Development, File No. A-7-21 (August 2, 2022), provides guidance on the dangers that can arise when companies incorrectly classify workers as independent contractors rather than employees. Under the state’s Unemployment Compensation Act (UCL), the “ABC test” is used to determine whether certain workers are properly classified as employees or independent contractors. See NJSA43:21-19(i)(6)(A)-(C). The new court ruling is significant because it held that the establishment by an entrepreneur of a separate business structure through which to provide services may not be sufficient to establish independent contractor status in under the ABC criterion.

The three parts of the ABC test

According to the ABC test, services rendered by an individual for remuneration will be considered employment unless the following factors are fully satisfied:

(a) The individual has been and will continue to be free of any control or direction over the performance of this service, both under their service agreement and in fact; and

(b) the services are outside the usual scope of the activity for which this service is provided, or that this service is provided outside all the establishments of the company for which this service is provided; and

(c) The individual is habitually engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession or business.

See NJSA 43:21-19(i)(6). All three components must be met for a worker to be considered an independent contractor under the UCL.

Although the New Jersey Supreme Court has previously adopted the ABC test to determine whether a person is an employee or an independent contractor for the purposes of resolving wage payment and wage and hour claims (Hargrove vs. Sleepy’s LLC, 220 NJ 289 (2015)), this stringent test differs from other tests used by New Jersey courts in other contexts.

For example, in determining whether a worker is an independent contractor under New Jersey’s anti-discrimination law, courts apply factor 12 Pukowski test, analyze: (1) the employer’s right to control the means and manner of the worker’s performance; (2) type of occupancy—supervised or unsupervised; (3) competence; (4) who provides the equipment and the workplace; (5) the length of time the individual worked; (6) method of payment; (7) the mode of termination of the employment relationship; (8) whether there are annual holidays; (9) whether the work is an integral part of the employer’s business; (10) whether the worker accrues retirement benefits; (11) whether the employer pays social security contributions; and (12) the intention of the parties. See Pukowsky v. Caruso, 312 NJ Super. 171, 182-83 (App. Div. 1998).

The East Bay Drywall Decision

The employer in this case, East Bay, performs drywall installations in New Jersey. The company relied on “subcontractors” to fulfill its contractual obligations. East Bay would bid on projects and, once accepted, would contact workers to determine their availability to work on the project. Workers were free to accept or decline offers from East Bay, and some workers reportedly left the middle of the settlement if they found better-paying jobs. While the East Bay manager testified that some workers said they worked for companies outside East Bay, he admitted he could produce no evidence to support his claim that they did so regularly. Additionally, while East Bay supplies the raw materials, the workers themselves do the work, provide their own tools and arrange transportation to the job site. After conducting an audit, the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (DOL) determined that half of the alleged contractors working for East Bay should have been classified as employees. East Bay disputed the results.

The court was therefore tasked with determining whether certain workers used by East Bay were classified as workers or independent contractors under the UCL by applying the ABC test to the facts presented. The key to such an analysis is whether a worker can maintain an independent and separate business from the employer.
East Bay Drywall to *19. To discharge its burden and satisfy Part C of the ABC test, East Bay submitted the contractors’ business entity registration documents and certificates of insurance to show business independence. East Bay also relied on its principal’s testimony that the contractors were free to accept or decline offers and on its statement (without supporting evidence) that they also worked for other entities.

Creating an LLC or Corporation Alone Isn’t Sufficient

The East Bay Drywall The ruling finds that the putative independent contractor’s establishment of a corporation or limited liability partnership is not, on its own, sufficient to show an independently established business under Part C of the ABC test. . The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that East Bay could not discharge its burden challenging the DOL’s decision that some contractors were in fact employees in light of the principle that UCL is corrective and its provisions are interpreted liberally. A worker’s mere refusal to accept or complete assigned work has limited probative value, the court found, and a certificate of insurance, although having higher probative value, and the registration information of related business entity are not definitive as a business may be duly registered but entirely dependent on a single entity as a source of work.

The court also found that East Bay’s position was undermined by its failure to demonstrate that the workers were able to maintain an independent business under Part C of the ABC test, including with respect to factors such as:

[T]has duration and strength of [worker’s] the activity, the number of customers and their respective volume of activity, or the number of employees; neither [the record evidence] address the amount of compensation each “drywall subcontractor” received from East Bay compared to that received from others for the same services.

East Bay Drywall at *24. Thus, and due to the court’s concern that some companies may require workers to assume the guise of an independent business entity in name only to justify classification as an independent contractor, it has ruled that East Bay could not rely on corporate records to satisfy branch C of the ABC test. This limited business registration information, combined with a handful of one-year certificates of insurance, was found to be insufficient to prove true independence and, therefore, the workers in question were therefore correctly classified as employed by opposition to independent contractors.

Carry

In light of this recent ruling, New Jersey companies that classify certain workers as independent contractors should consider regular reassessments to ensure compliance with the ABC test as applied under UCL. Since the classification of workers generally requires a factual analysis, any company that relies solely on Stream A, B or C independently, rather than being able to satisfy all three factors, can do so at its risks and perils. Firms that take this approach may be required to retroactively pay employer contributions to unemployment and temporary disability compensation funds if it is determined that they misclassified their workers.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

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Knotts named CIO; Jalso to Retire Next Year and Support Transition to New Chief Information Security Officer | Electronic News https://onsdorp.net/knotts-named-cio-jalso-to-retire-next-year-and-support-transition-to-new-chief-information-security-officer-electronic-news/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 12:13:00 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/knotts-named-cio-jalso-to-retire-next-year-and-support-transition-to-new-chief-information-security-officer-electronic-news/ After a successful interim appointment, Brice Knotts was named permanent Associate Vice President and Chief Information Officer of the University. Vice President of Strategic Initiatives Rob Alsop said the appointment reflects Knotts’ success in building collaborative partnerships across the institution and establishing a long-term vision for the role of technology in the future of the […]]]>

After a successful interim appointment, Brice Knotts was named permanent Associate Vice President and Chief Information Officer of the University. Vice President of Strategic Initiatives Rob Alsop said the appointment reflects Knotts’ success in building collaborative partnerships across the institution and establishing a long-term vision for the role of technology in the future of the university.

Knotts is already playing a vital leadership role in the WVU Modernization Program, overseeing information technology services and supporting many projects that will take place over the next five to seven years. The program aims to prepare WVU for future challenges by establishing a strong and flexible foundation based on modern technology and effective and efficient business processes that support an engaging student experience.

With the CIO in place, the interim appointments also become permanent for Jerod Hall, ITS Executive Director for Enterprise Applications, and Neil Jones, ITS Director of Technology Planning. Meanwhile, longtime Chief Information Security Officer Alex Jalso plans to retire in mid-July 2023, concluding 30 years of service at the University. WVU will soon begin a nationwide search for a new Chief Information Security Officer (CISO), and Jalso will help with the transition.

The WVU Modernization Project team has been working on a new information security strategy roadmap, and the CISO will be a key hire as this process continues. Knotts hopes the new CISO will join its ITS leadership team by January 2023. The position will be posted in the coming weeks.

WVU will seek an experienced, collaborative leader who can help create a culture where information security is a shared responsibility across the company. As WVU grows the information security program, it will need someone with a proven ability to balance risk with the usability and mission of the organization.

Knotts, who was named Deputy CIO and Executive Director of Enterprise Applications in September 2019, was appointed to the position of Interim CIO in April 2021. In this role, he assumed responsibility for advising senior management of the University on technology issues and to provide day-to-day operational oversight of HIS.

Knotts has worked for WVU for 27 years, starting as an administrative network manager in 1995 and rising to assistant director of computer science student affairs in 1999. He became associate director of that unit a year later, then director in 2007 Knotts was appointed director of the former Student Systems Management (SSM) group in March 2012, then Executive Director for Enterprise Infrastructure in April 2015 after ITS was created by the merger of SSM, the Office of Information Technology ( OIT) and the Administrative Technology Solutions (ATS) group. Student Life Computing and Research Computing then joined ITS.

Knotts holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in computer science from WVU, as well as a master’s degree in business administration.

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Disney+’s The Santa Clauses trailer sees Tim Allen’s Scott Calvin retire and seek his successor https://onsdorp.net/disneys-the-santa-clauses-trailer-sees-tim-allens-scott-calvin-retire-and-seek-his-successor/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 01:49:39 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/disneys-the-santa-clauses-trailer-sees-tim-allens-scott-calvin-retire-and-seek-his-successor/ Earlier this year, the public learned that Disney would bring Tim Allen back to life Santa Claus franchise – but not in the way some might have expected. The Christmas Movie IP is being brought back in the form of a limited series called Santa Clauses. The fans only got a behind-the-scenes look, courtesy of […]]]>

Earlier this year, the public learned that Disney would bring Tim Allen back to life Santa Claus franchise – but not in the way some might have expected. The Christmas Movie IP is being brought back in the form of a limited series called Santa Clauses. The fans only got a behind-the-scenes look, courtesy of Allen, up to this point. But now the first trailer for the show has arrived, and it shows Scott Calvin preparing for retirement and interviewing potential new Santas. And one of those interviewees happens to be an NFL veteran.

As the trailer shows, Santa Clauses sees Scott Calvin choose to give up on his gig — without falling off a roof and someone else wearing his jacket, of course. So the search for a new Kris Kringle begins, and it looks like some interesting people will be in the running. One of those people is former NFL quarterback Peyton Manning, who seems very confident that he’s the man for the job. (Although it seems Calvin would be a little more comfortable if it was Tom Brady looking for the job.)

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7 Mistakes Young People Make When Joining the FIRE Movement https://onsdorp.net/7-mistakes-young-people-make-when-joining-the-fire-movement/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 12:06:35 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/7-mistakes-young-people-make-when-joining-the-fire-movement/ stuti / iStock.com Many generations, including Gen Z and Millennials, are working to join the FIRE movement. FIRE – Financial Independence Retire Early – is based on the principle of saving as much money as you can now to retire early and achieve financial independence. The future of finance: Generation Z and their relationship with […]]]>

stuti / iStock.com

Many generations, including Gen Z and Millennials, are working to join the FIRE movement. FIRE – Financial Independence Retire Early – is based on the principle of saving as much money as you can now to retire early and achieve financial independence.

The future of finance: Generation Z and their relationship with money
Read more: 7 surprisingly easy ways to reach your retirement goals

While Gen Z in particular has some financial leverage over previous generations, success with FIRE means making careful money moves. If you are a young person considering joining the FIRE movement, be careful not to make these mistakes.

Become obsessed with reaching a number, not the endpoint

Maggie Tucker is the co-host of the personal finance podcast titled friends on FIRE. Tucker, who recently retired early at 41, said a common mistake young people make when joining the FIRE movement is obsessing over reaching a certain number instead of enjoying the journey along the way.

“When young people first experience FIRE, they can get really excited and motivated, and that initial excitement can lead to complete obsession with the goal and the endpoint,” Tucker said. “We think it’s just as important to enjoy the journey along the way. There’s a way to balance staying focused on your goals and enjoying the trip and the money you’re working hard to earn. It’s all about balance and compromise.

Take our survey: How do you typically split the restaurant bill?

Underestimating how much they really need to retire

If you think you can live on $25,000 a year in retirement, Tucker recommends considering doubling that number with the kids and recalculating to figure out what you really need.

Young people often underestimate the future cost of medical insurance, having a family, home emergencies and other unforeseen expenses.

Samantha Hawrylack, co-founder of How to shoot, also said that not saving enough money is a major problem faced by young people who want to reach FIRE. Hawrylack recommends starting small. Cut costs and set aside a certain percentage of your income each month. This will increase your savings rate over time and allow you to invest for the long term.

“If you can’t save a lot at first, that’s okay. Just be sure to automatically transfer money to your savings account each month so you can gradually increase your savings rate,” Hawrylack said.

Enter without a plan

Young people who want to reach FIRE should not start unless they have a plan. And that plan must be specific to their FIRE needs.

“FIRE is not a one-size-fits-all program,” Hawrylack said. “You have Lean FIRE, Fat FIRE, Barista FIRE, in addition to other variations. Without researching which strategy fits your goals and establishing an appropriate plan to achieve those goals, you might end up living more frugally than necessary or failing to invest as needed to meet your early retirement date or be unable to live up to your ideal retirement standard.

Research the type of FIRE you want to perform. Next, Hawrylack recommends calculating your FIRE number and establishing the type of investments and savings you need to make to reach your goals. When you start planning, track your progress to stay on track.

Not taking advantage of tax-advantaged accounts

If you haven’t opened an IRA or started contributing to your company’s 401(k) yet, now is the time to do so. Tax-advantaged accounts can help you save on taxes and grow your wealth faster.

Max these accounts every year. If you can’t contribute the maximum amount, make sure you contribute at least enough to get the employer match.

Not being on the same page

Those who want to start their FIRE journey with a spouse or partner to have to be on the same page. This includes everything from creating a plan, setting goals, and maintaining discipline so you can follow those plans.

“If one of you is comfortable living as little as possible and the other likes to indulge once in a while, it is imperative to communicate and compromise on the type of FIRE trip you are on. get on board,” Hawrylack said. “You’re unlikely to be able to stay the course if you can’t find common ground to agree on.”

Thinking that living with less for a long time is synonymous with happiness

In your 20s or early 30s, eating ramen for dinner or sharing an apartment with a roommate might not bother you. However, Tucker said that as you get older, you might enjoy living in your own home, taking fancier vacations and enjoying nicer meals.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that your future should be based on maintaining a financially stripped lifestyle. “You can mitigate this by increasing your estimate of your annual cost of living that you use to calculate your FIRE goal,” Tucker said.

Thinking that retirement will solve all the problems in your life

Tucker, who is only five months away from retirement, can personally attest that it doesn’t bring anyone instant happiness. Sorry to burst bubbles, but retirement doesn’t magically solve other problems you have in your life either.

The truth is that happiness comes from within and from your mindset, which you all have the power to change or rearrange right now.

“You should learn what makes you happy and what doesn’t and design the life you want before you retire,” Tucker recommends. “You can increase it and evolve it further once you retire, but you need a pre-retirement happiness base to enjoy your retirement.”

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Moon Landrieu dies; New Orleans mayor led on civil rights https://onsdorp.net/moon-landrieu-dies-new-orleans-mayor-led-on-civil-rights/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 20:08:07 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/moon-landrieu-dies-new-orleans-mayor-led-on-civil-rights/ Moon Landrieu, who battled segregationists as a young Louisiana state legislator in the 1960s, entered New Orleans city government during his transformative years as mayor in the 1960s. 70 and was the patriarch of a Democratic political dynasty, died September 5 at age 8. 30 a.m. at his family home in New Orleans. He was […]]]>

Moon Landrieu, who battled segregationists as a young Louisiana state legislator in the 1960s, entered New Orleans city government during his transformative years as mayor in the 1960s. 70 and was the patriarch of a Democratic political dynasty, died September 5 at age 8. 30 a.m. at his family home in New Orleans. He was 92 years old.

His death was confirmed by his daughter, Madeleine Landrieu. He recently had a heart attack.

Mr. Landrieu was the father of Mary Landrieu, a former three-term U.S. senator from Louisiana, and Mitch Landrieu, a former mayor of New Orleans currently serving under President Biden as a senior adviser on implementing implemented last year’s $1.2 trillion legislation to improve the nation. Infrastructure.

The eldest Landrieu had been the first of his family to enter politics – his parents “had no political power, no money, nothing at all”, he said once — and he was appointed by President Jimmy Carter to serve as secretary of housing and urban development from 1979 to 1981. But his legacy lay primarily in his political career in Louisiana during and after the civil rights movement.

“Despite continued fierce resistance,” wrote historian Arnold R. Hirsh, Mr. Landrieu “saw and brought the future to New Orleans.”

Mr. Landrieu first held elected office as a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives, where he was elected in 1960 amid turbulent racial tensions. Six years earlier, the United States Supreme Court had banned racial segregation in public schools with its landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education. However, many white parents and politicians intensely resisted the decision, and Southern schools remained unintegrated.

Although he was one of the most junior members of the legislature – he was 29 when he took office – Mr Landrieu took issue with the efforts of Gov. Jimmie H. Davis (D) and his supporters segregationists to thwart the integration of New Orleans public schools. . On at least one occasion, Mr. Landrieu was the only legislator to vote against the governor. He reportedly received death threats.

After a court ordered the integration to continue, federal marshals were dispatched to escort 6-year-old Ruby Bridges to first grade at the city’s William Frantz Public School on November 14, 1960, while she became one of the first black students to enter an elementary school in the South. She endured teasing and threats as she walked to school in a scene depicted in Norman Rockwell’s painting “The problem we all live with.”

Lucille Bridges, who supported her daughter Ruby during school desegregation, dies at 86

Of 1966 to 1970Mr. Landrieu was a member of the New Orleans City Council, where he continued his efforts for racial equality. His wish, he says the Southern Oral History Programwas to “destroy all remnants of racial and religious prejudice in this city”.

After passage of the Federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, he pushed through a measure that offered additional protections against discrimination in New Orleans public housing. Decades before the modern movement to remove Confederate symbols from public places, he successfully advocated for the Confederate flag to be removed from council chambers.

In 1970, with a report With 90% of the black vote and the support of many white liberals, Mr. Landrieu was elected mayor of New Orleans. One of his main campaign pledges had been to bring more African Americans into local government and public service.

“The black people who worked at City Hall were mop-and-broom workers,” said Norman C. Francis, a Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient who served nearly five decades as a as president of Xavier University of Louisiana, the only historically black and Catholic university in the United States. “Moon made it known that we were going to change that.”

Among other appointments, Mr. Landrieu named as administrative director Terrence R. Duvernay, an African-American who later served as assistant secretary of HUD in the Clinton administration. When Mr. Landrieu took office in 1970, less than 20% of municipal civil service jobs were held by African Americans. By the time he left eight years later, the figure was 43 percent, according to Hirsch’s 1992 volume “Creole New Orleans: Race and Americanization.”

“He showed great political courage, moral vision [and] great courage to fend off those who were against the future,” said Lawrence N. Powell, professor emeritus of Southern history and race relations at Tulane University in New Orleans, in an interview.

According to his account, Mr. Landrieu has not done enough to bring African Americans into the “mainstream of economic life”, although he has sought to award more government contracts to minority-owned businesses.

His tenure was not without controversy. The Superdome, the stadium that remade the New Orleans skyline, opened under his watch in 1975 at a cost of more than $160 million and amid a cloud of questions about its funding, management and its construction.

Some historical preservationists have objected to Mr. Landrieu’s renovation of the French Market in the French Quarter of New Orleans. But this project, along with the construction of the river walk known as the Moon Walk, has helped attract tourists to the city.

Decades after leaving office, Mr. Landrieu has retained widespread respect for his efforts to improve race relations in the city. He used “every inch of his body to change New Orleans when it came to civil rights,” Francis said.

Mitch Landrieu, who served as mayor from 2010 to 2018 and was the first white man to hold the position since his father’s term, presided over the dismantling of the city’s Confederate monuments. He came to national attention in 2017 with a speech on the matter.

Mayor of New Orleans: Why I’m taking down my city’s Confederate monuments

“These monuments deliberately celebrate a fictional, sanitized Confederacy,” said Mitch Landrieu, “ignoring death, ignoring slavery and the terror it truly represented.”

he later describe the speech as “the culmination not just of my work but of my father’s”.

Maurice Edwin Landrieu, the younger of two sons, was born in New Orleans on July 23, 1930. His father was employed by the city as what Mr. Landrieu described as a “blue collar.” His mother ran a local grocery store and later became a real estate agent.

Mr Landrieu was nicknamed “Moon” as a child and legally changed his name in 1969 to be listed as “Moon Landrieu” on ballots.

He was a gifted athlete and pitched for the Loyola University New Orleans baseball team, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1952 and a law degree in 1954.

He served in the military before establishing a law firm in 1957. He found an early political mentor in New Orleans Mayor deLesseps S. “Chep” Morrison.

In addition to his legal practice, Mr. Landrieu has invested in real estate development projects in New Orleans. During Senate hearings on his nomination as HUD secretary, he faced questions about possible conflicts of interest with his government job, but was easily confirmed. Among his priorities as secretary of HUD was the revitalization of downtown areas.

Mr. Landrieu served as a judge on the Louisiana Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals for nearly a decade until his retirement in 2000.

In the years following his departure from public office, Louisiana became increasingly Republican. Mary Landrieu, who rose to national prominence as her state’s spokesperson in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, was defeated by US Representative Bill Cassidy (right) in a runoff in 2014 .

Survivors include his wife of nearly seven decades, the former Verna Marie Satterlee of New Orleans; nine children, Mary Landrieu of New Orleans and Washington, Mitch Landrieu, Mark Landrieu, Michelle “Shelley” Landrieu, Madeleine Landrieu, Martin Landrieu and Maurice Landrieu Jr., all of New Orleans, Melanie Cook of Mandeville, La ., and Melinda Seiter of Mobile, Alabama; 37 grandchildren; and 15 great-grandchildren.

Mr. Landrieu once reflected as mayor on his early years in public service and the strengths he overcame as he continued his civil rights work, beginning with his service in the legislature.

“I never thought I would be re-elected” he saidrecalling his stand against school segregationists, “but I didn’t care”.

“It was one of those crises of conscience…when a man has to decide what to do with himself,” he observed. “I thought about it…and I prayed about it, and I just decided that I wasn’t going to sell myself for it. If that’s what I had to do to stay in public service, I just wasn’t going to do it. I just did what I had to do.

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Republicans must take Social Security seriously – Twin Cities https://onsdorp.net/republicans-must-take-social-security-seriously-twin-cities/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 11:18:29 +0000 https://onsdorp.net/republicans-must-take-social-security-seriously-twin-cities/ We have reached the point in the midterm election campaign where Democrats insist that Republicans are eager to destroy Social Security. The usual ploy is to take the spurious comments of one or two Republicans and pretend they represent a secret, sinister plan. In October 2018, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell observed that “there is […]]]>

We have reached the point in the midterm election campaign where Democrats insist that Republicans are eager to destroy Social Security. The usual ploy is to take the spurious comments of one or two Republicans and pretend they represent a secret, sinister plan.

In October 2018, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell observed that “there is a bipartisan reluctance to address rights changes.” His Democratic counterpart, Chuck Schumer, said he had “shown who the Republican Party really is”. Schumer even convinced some reporters to buy the spin McConnell had said “the GOP will push to cut Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security spending” if he retained control of the Senate.

In the election a few weeks later, Republicans extended their control over the Senate. They have not decided to remove any of these programs.

Republicans are not plotting to undermine Social Security. They don’t even have a plan to fix it. Which is too bad, because profits continue to grow beyond program revenue. Andrew Biggs, a colleague of mine at the American Enterprise Institute and former commissioner of the program, calculates that the monthly benefits for an American retiring today, even accounting for inflation, are about a third higher than they were for those who retired 20 years ago. .

If we want benefits to continue to increase as planned, we need to have widespread tax increases. But most people would rather keep their taxes low and save for themselves. For this to work, we need to moderate the growth of benefits so that they keep up with inflation but don’t grow much more.

Ideally, a minimum benefit sufficient to lift all seniors out of poverty would be established at the same time. The current program, surprisingly enough given the amount of money it spends, does not provide this protection.

Republicans do not talk about such reforms. Instead, Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, running for re-election, said Social Security should become a “discretionary” government-funded program in each year’s budget. Senator Rick Scott of Florida has proposed requiring all government programs, presumably but not explicitly including Social Security, to obtain affirmative renewal every five years. Arizona Senate candidate Blake Masters said in the primaries, “Maybe we should privatize Social Security. Private retirement accounts, get the government out of this.

These comments are the basis of the Democrats’ current scare campaign. But none of these ideas are going anywhere. McConnell specifically disavowed Scott’s. And Masters disowned his people: “I don’t want to privatize Social Security,” he said after winning the primary.

What these proposals demonstrate is not that the program is in political danger. This is because the taboo against questioning the program has discouraged serious reflection on how to reform it.

Masters’ first thought echoed a Republican argument from nearly 20 years ago. The George W. Bush administration wanted young workers to have the ability to invest a portion of their Social Security contributions in personal accounts.

It was an extremely controversial proposal that failed to pass a Republican Congress. But it made more sense then than it does today. At the time, the program’s payroll taxes brought in enough revenue to cover retiree checks while funding new accounts. The surplus has raised the possibility that we may begin to transition to a new system before the baby boomers retire.

None of this is true now. Over 30 million baby boomers have already retired and the surplus has turned into a deficit. The premise of Bush’s plan is therefore no longer true. The masters started it anyway because Republicans haven’t thought about how to fix Social Security since that plan failed.

The other Republican ideas aren’t much better thought out. If we demanded a vote to renew Social Security every five years, it would almost certainly become a ritual. Subjecting the program to the annual budget process could in theory reduce the growth of benefits over time, but it could also lead to a bidding war that would increase this growth.

If Congress and the President had the will to moderate benefit growth to keep in line with incomes, they could simply legislate to change the benefit formula. This approach, unlike changing benefits every year, would make retirement income more predictable for beneficiaries.

The Democrats can’t really be blamed for taking the overtures the Republicans gave them. But seniors and those expecting to retire in the next few years need not worry about the program being in jeopardy from Republicans. It’s the younger ones who have to worry that neither party wants to control program spending.

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